Trillium Flower – Free Crochet Pattern

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The Trillium flower is found in many northern states and parts of Canada. The Great White Trillium is the official flower of Ontario and the official wildflower of Ohio. Trilliums are commonly white, pink, purple, red, and even yellow in color.

 

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Great White Trillium by JackFrost2121 under CC-BY-SA-3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

 

Unfortunately, this flower is very delicate – some species of Trillium are endangered and several states have laws against picking wild trillium. It’s best to admire from afar and crochet your own!

 

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Click the photo for the Trillium pattern.

 

This flower can be worked with any weight of yarn. Finer weights will create a smaller flower, and bulkier weights will create a larger flower. Use the hook size appropriate for the yarn you choose. We used worsted weight yarn and a size H-8 hook in our samples.

 

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Click the photo to shop Home Cotton yarn.

 

Watch the Right-Handed Video:

Watch the Left-Handed Video:

Here are the quick links to the products and pages listed in this post:

Trillium Pattern

Home Cotton Yarn

Right-Handed video

Left-Handed video

 

Maggie is excited to offer Five Free Flower Patterns: Dutch IrisElephant EarsPink MagnoliaPrimrose, and Trillium.

Get more free flower patterns here.

 

Hugs, Maggie

 

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Comments
  1. Marlene Gerlach

    I watched the trillium tutorial. Loved it, but couldn’t find it anywhere to print out the written pattern. Must I watch it again and quickly write it down as it goes along? Bummer. Also, it took me half of the tutorial before I realized that the narrator was saying “picket” When she must actually mean “picot” pronounced “peek`-oh.”
    I am 79 and as far as I know it has always been “peek`-oh.”
    I think I may not be the only one confused by that.

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